ELPUB Keynote Speaker – ROBERT CARTOLANO

ROBERT CARTOLANO

Robert Cartolano is the Columbia University Libraries Associate Vice President for Technology and Preservation. 

Rob is a graduate of Columbia University’s Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, and has been a member of Columbia’s staff since 1986, when he joined Academic Information Systems as a programmer/consultant.

He held the roles of Manager of Academic Technologies and Senior Director of Client Technology Services for Columbia University Information Technology, where he supervised the development and deployment of the campus-wide learning management system, printing system, electronic classrooms, public computing facilities and email applications.

Since joining the Libraries in 2007, Cartolano has supervised the development and implementation of digital preservation storage, the opening of multiple digital centers, Blacklight-based unified discovery, ReCAP shared collection services, digital library collections, copyright advisory services, and digital project management.

Rob serves as Treasurer of the DuraSpace Board of Directors, is a member of the Lyrasis Leader’s Circle and plays leadership roles for the Fedora and VIVO community-based open source platforms. 

Rob is currently coordinating efforts to Imagine a Better Academic Ebook Experience, leveraging open standards, interoperability and community-based open source.

 

KEYNOTE

Sustaining an Open Scholarly Ecosystem with Community-Based Open Source

Institutions around the world have turned to community-based infrastructure to address the challenges of the scholarly ecosystem. Leveraging the benefits of the open ecosystem including but not limited to open source and open data, it is increasingly possible to develop innovative services at scale.  Organizations such as HathiTrust, DuraSpace, Lyrasis and others have achieved a level of success in supporting community-based projects that meet the needs of hundreds of institutions.  This talk will summarize recent successes, challenges for today, and emerging opportunities that can help to accelerate our collective efforts to support an open scholarly ecosystem.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.